Pediatric Hematology/
Oncology

Patient Care

Bass Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases

The newly renovated Bass Center for Childhood Cancer and Blood Diseases, is a state-of-the-art home for a medical team long recognized for excellence. It’s also part of Stanford’s Cancer Center, which achieved prestigious Cancer Center designation from the National Cancer Institute in 2007.  It provides a fully-integrated environment to facilitate the best possible care for patients with blood disease and cancer.  In addition, it provides a dedicated unit for patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

With the Bass Center’s opening in 2008, the number of Packard beds devoted to stem cell transplant nearly tripled, from 5 to 12 and the Center’s total bed count rose from 16 to 27. This is the largest dedicated pediatric oncology/SCT unit in Northern California. All aspects of the Bass Center were planned to reduce stress on patients and families and improve the quality and continuity of care.

The intent was to create a hopeful, healing environment by moving most services for cancer and blood diseases to one physical location in the hospital, expediting care and making it easier and more comfortable for patients and providers. The center includes a clinic, an onsite laboratory, a fully equipped day hospital, a procedure unit with capability for general anesthesia and a specialized pharmacy. Children see the same nurses whether they’re receiving a chemotherapy infusion as outpatients or staying in the hospital for several weeks following a stem cell transplant. Providers from hospital services such as social work, psychiatry, occupational therapy, child life, and the hospital school also visit the center.

Nearly all inpatient beds are in private rooms, each equipped with a fold-out daybed that can sleep two parents. Other comforts include lounge areas equipped with toys, TVs and internet access, and a kitchen. For safety, measures such as a whole-unit HEPA filter protect fragile immune systems during stem cell transplant, a treatment which kills many of the body’s germ-fighting cells.

The new facility enables leukemia and lymphoma patients, as well as those with rare blood diseases, to receive transplants of all types of hematopoietic stem cells. Clinicians can treat patients using bone marrow from related and unrelated donors, autologous bone marrow, and stem cells harvested from umbilical cord blood or via apheresis.

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